Yom Kippur / יום כפור

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Yom Kippur (Hebrew: יוֹם כִּפּוּר or יום הכיפורים), Also known as Day of Atonement, is the holiest day of the year for the Jews. Its central themes are atonement and repentance. Jews traditionally observe this holy day with a 25-hour period of fasting and intensive prayer, often spending most of the day in synagogue services. Yom Kippur completes the annual period known in Judaism as the High Holy Days (or sometimes “the Days of Awe”).

Yom Kippur (on Shabbat) – יום כפור (בשבת)

Torah Portion:

Leviticus 16:1 – 16:34 & Numbers 29:7 – 29:11 1: Leviticus 16:1-3 2: Leviticus 16:4-6 3: Leviticus 16:7-11 4: Leviticus 16:12-17 5: Leviticus 16:18-24 6: Leviticus 16:25-30 7: Leviticus 16:31-34 maf: Numbers 29:7-11 (5 p’sukim)

Reference:

http://www.hebcal.com/holidays/yom-kippur#reading-on-shabbat

http://www.hebrew4christians.com/Holidays/holidays.html

 

Happy Yom Kippur – שמח יום כיפור

Bob Jackson – בוב ג’קסון

 

 

 

 

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Parashat Ha’Azinu / פרשת האזינו

This next read in the Diaspora on 27 September 2014 is Parashat Ha’Azinu is the 53rd weekly Torah portion in the annual Jewish cycle of Torah reading.

 

Portion (parasha) for this week:

Ha’azinu | האזינו | “Listen”

 

 

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Torah:  Deuteronomy 31:30 – 32:52

 

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Prophets:  2 Samuel 22:1-51; Hosea 14:1-9 (2-10); Micah 7:18-20; Joel 2:15-27

 

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Brit Hadasha:  John 21:1-25; Romans 10:14 – 11:12, 12:14-21; Hebrews 12:28-29

 

(click on a selected reading to be taken directly to it)

“Torah Portions” are a systematic teaching schedule that includes a portion of scripture from the Torah, Prophets, and Brit Hadasha each week.  This schedule is known all over the world, and serves as a great way to facilitate discussion and learning with others in the Body of the Messiah.

Shavua Tov – Good week – שבוע טוב

Bob Jackson – בוב ג’קסון

Rosh Hashana / ראש השנה

Rosh Hashanah (Hebrew: ראש השנה), (literally “head of the year”), is the Jewish New Year. It is the first of the High Holidays or Yamim Noraim (“Days of Awe”), celebrated ten days before Yom Kippur. Rosh Hashanah is observed on the first two days of Tishrei, the seventh month of the Hebrew calendar. It is described in the Torah as יום תרועה (Yom Teru’ah, a day of sounding [the Shofar]).

 

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Torah Reading today:

1: Genesis 21:1-4

2: Genesis 21:5-12

3: Genesis 21:13-21

4: Genesis 21:22-27

5: Genesis 21:28-34

 

We are in the Biblical year 5775

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L’Shanah Tovah – לשנה טובה

Bob Jackson – בוב ג’קסון

Leil Selichot / סליחות

Selichot clipart

 

For your information……copied from http://www.jewfaq.org/elul.htm#Selichot and http://www.hebcal.com/holidays/.

 

Significance: Time of reflection leading up to Rosh Hashanah (which begins 9/25/14 through 9/26/14) and Yom Kippur  (which begins October 4th 2014).

Customs: Blowing the shofar (ram’s horn); asking people for forgiveness; reciting penitential prayers.

Selichot or slichot (Hebrew: סליחות) are Jewish penitential poems and prayers, especially those said in the period leading up to the High Holidays, and on Fast Days. In the Ashkenazic tradition, it begins on the Saturday night before Rosh Hashanah. If, however, the first day of Rosh Hashanah falls on Monday or Tuesday, Selichot are said beginning the Saturday night prior to ensure that Selichot are recited at least four times.

Selichot As the month of Elul draws to a close, the mood of repentance becomes more urgent. Prayers for forgiveness called selichot (properly pronounced “s’lee-KHOHT,” but often pronounced “SLI-khus”) are added to the daily cycle of religious services. Selichot are recited in the early morning, before normal daily shacharit service. They add about 45 minutes to the regular daily service. Selichot are recited from the Sunday before Rosh Hashanah until Yom Kippur. If Rosh Hashanah begins on a Monday or Tuesday, selichot begins on the Sunday of the week before Hashanah, to make sure that there are at least 3 days of Selichot. The first selichot service of the holiday season is usually a large community service, held around midnight on Motzaei Shabbat (the night after the sabbath ends; that is, after nightfall on Saturday) . The entire community, including men, women and older children, attend the service, and the rabbi gives a sermon. The remaining selichot services are normally only attended by those who ordinarily attend daily shacharit services in synagogue.

Parashat Nitzavim / פרשת נצבים

Portion (parasha) for this week: Nitzavim/Vayelech | נצבים/וילך | “Standing/He Went”

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Torah: Deuteronomy 29:10(9) – 31:29

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Prophets: Isaiah 55:6-56:8, 61:10-63:9

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Brit Hadasha: Luke 24:1-43; Romans 7:7-12, 9:30-10:13; Hebrews 12:14-15, 13:5-8

 

“Torah Portions” are a systematic teaching schedule that includes a portion of scripture from the Torah, Prophets, and Hadasha each week. This schedule is known all over the world, and serves as a great way to facilitate discussion and learning with others in the Body of the Messiah.

ברוך השם

בוב ג’קסון

Parashat Ki Tavo / פרשת כי־תבוא

Thid next read in the Diaspora on 13 September 2014 is Parashat Ki Tavo. It is the 50th weekly Torah portion in the annual Jewish cycle of  the Torah reading.

Portion (parasha) for this week: Ki Tavo | כי תבוא | “When You Come In”

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Torah: Deuteronomy 26:1 – 29:9(8)

 

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Prophets: Isaiah 60:1-22

 

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Brit Hadasha: Matthew 13:1-23; Luke 21:1-4, 23:26-56; Acts 7:30-36, 28:17-31; Romans 11:1-24

 

“Torah Portions” are a systematic teaching schedule that includes a portion of scripture from the Torah, Prophets, and Brit Hadasha each week. This schedule is known all over the world, and serves as a great way to facilitate discussion and learning with others in the Body of the Messiah.

 

Have a blessed week – יש לי שבוע מבורך

Bob jackson – בוב ג’קסון

 

 

Parashat Ki Teitzei / פרשת כי־תצא

This read in the Diaspora on 06 September 2014 is Parashat Ki Teitzei. It is the 49th weekly Torah portion in the annual Jewish cycle of  the Torah reading.

Ki Tetze | כי תצא | “When You Go Forth”

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Torah: Deuteronomy 21:10 – 25:19

 

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Prophets: Isaiah 52:13 – 54:10

 

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Brit Hadasha: Matthew 5:31-32, 19:3-12; Mark 12:18-27; Luke 23:1-25; 1 Corinthians 5:1-5, 9:4-18; Galatians 3:9-14, 1 Timothy 5:17-18

 

“Torah Portions” are a systematic teaching schedule that includes a portion of scripture from the Torah, Prophets, and Brit Hadasha each week. This schedule is known all over the world, and serves as a great way to facilitate discussion and learning with others in the Body of the Messiah.

 

Shalom – שלום

Bob Jackson –  בוב ג’קסון